July 30

1922

During his stay in France, Nguyen Ai Quoc attended the funeral of Jules Guesde, a French leftist politician, at the Père Lachaise cemetery. The same day he attended a meeting at Saint Gervais.

File photo of President Ho Chi Minh

French spies kept tabs on him.

1931

The British Governor in Hong Kong signed a fourth arrest warrant to prolong Nguyen Ai Quoc’s detention in Hong Kong for the court case.

1948

In “Keep secrecy” he wrote in Su That (The Truth) under the pseudonym A.G., President Ho Chi Minh said: “Sun Tzu, a leading Chinese master of military affairs, once said: ‘What is the most important thing in war? That is keeping secrecy’. That means wining or failing in a war largely depends on whether or not one can keep their secrets.”

The president concluded: “Are we keeping our secrecy in this war? Not yet. When we can keep secrecy, we will have an advantage and achieve victory.”
 
1950

In “Asking for instructions, sending reports” he wrote for Su That under the pseudonym XYZ, President Ho Chi Minh said: “Some officials work without seeking instructions or, when the work is done, reporting to their superiors. The phenomenon can be seen at many places. They fail to understand that such a working style is undisciplined and anarchical. Due to this wrong style, many localities have suffered bitter failures.”

He stressed the need for ensuring close relations between local and central administrations. He also gave instructions on how to make an effective report.

He wrote: “Reports must be prepared sincerely, specifically, concisely, and practically. Arguments and figures in a report must be analyzed and proved. It is unacceptable to speak or write at random. It is not advisable to ramble without focused points. When we overcome our shortcomings, we will partly defeat our enemy.”

1962

At a meeting of the Politburo to discuss the State budget for 1963, President Ho Chi Minh said: “Every year since peace was restored in our country, we have failed to fulfill our budget targets. The situation has become increasingly stressful. We must adopt certain measures, such as cutting down spending on construction, to satisfy people’s needs and alleviate the tense situation.

Human affairs are of great importance. We need to build more factories as soon as possible, but what is of more significance is the happiness of the people. After all, whatever we are creating is aimed at serving human beings.”

1969

President Ho Chi Minh heard mathematician Hoang Tuy report on the application of “operations analysis” in distribution of goods to facilitate trade at shops.

Prof. Tuy recalled: “The President advised me to use certain words as a replacement for the term ‘operations analysis’ for easier understanding. He said: ‘Even I fail to understand what the term really is.’

“Operations analysis is a support instrument in our resistance war. Some of our soldiers have not got enough training in it but they still achieved good performance. Why did they perform so well? He pointed to his heart and said: ‘Because of this’.”

By Duong Trung Quoc* and his assistants
*The author is a historian and member of the National Assembly

Translated by Truc Thinh

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