Landslide Spreads in Mekong Delta

The crack at Tra Noc market has continued to spread a further 100 meters in length. Due to heavy rain and high water levels during the last few days many cracks have spread along the streets and in residential housing along the banks of the Tra Noc River and in a section near Tra Noc market.

Erosion has become increasingly serious .

Mr. Nguyen Hung Viet, vice-president of Tra Noc Ward in the Binh Thuy District of Can Tho City, announced that due to heavy rain and high water levels during the last few days many cracks have spread along the streets and in residential housing along the banks of the Tra Noc River and in a section near Tra Noc market.

At the site of the first incident, where 13 houses fell into the river on June 10, landslides are continuing to threaten the land and nearby houses.

Only forty out of seventy-one families asked to move to a safer place have reportedly moved, staying either in hostels or in relatives’ homes.

The fallen houses lying in the bottom of the Tra Noc River may cause damage to passing ships; however, they have yet to be salvaged because of financial shortages.

In Ben Tre Province, the banks of the An Hoa River in Chau Thanh District are in danger of falling into the river below.

Ho Huu Sang, Deputy Secretary of An Hoa Commune has reported that a landslide of 6 meters by 3 meters recently occurred and that 48 houses in this dangerous area need moving immediately.

Forecasts predict that the landslide in the Mekong Delta Region is likely to continue sporadically.

According to an erosion survey of the riverbanks along the Ham Luong, Co Chien, My Tho-Cua Dai, Ba Lai, Ben Tre-An Hoa, Mo Cay, Cho Lach and Vam Cai Quao rivers, most have been falling down at an average of 3 to 5 meters a year.

The recent landslide at the Co Chien riverbank is in a serious situation with the slide of 0.5 to 10 meters stretching 35.5 km along the banks.

Erosion has become an increasingly serious situation due to the rapid flow of water hitting the weak banks and the waves caused by numerous passing ships. In addition, heavy construction along the riverbanks and sand mining from the bottom of the river has caused the water current to change.

By H.P.L.- B.D.-T.M.T. – Translated by Xuan Huong

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